Not enough or Too much?

By Christopher R Rice


When someone cons or swindles you it is usually because of your ignorance or your greed or some combination of both, right? Can we then deduce that not all smart people have our best interest at heart? Some people have wrapped themselves in the American flag only to distract us while they picked our pockets clean. If you know what I mean.

So when someone told me that no matter what, there just isn't enough room / food for everyone, I just had to laugh. Because in reality there is more than enough, what we've been told has all been lies to make the rich a little richer while stealing from you and me.

Forty percent of the grain grown in the US goes to feed animals instead of hungry people. If that same grain had gone directly to human beings there would be enough food to feed everyone many times over. But on a meat based diet there is not enough food to feed everyone and consequently 10 to 20 million children will die from malnutrition this year. It takes 25 gallons of water to produce a pound of wheat. But it takes 2,500 gallons of water to produce a pound of meat. Half of all of the drinking water in the US goes to farm animals. Eighty percent of all of the corn grown in the US goes to animals going to slaughter.


It doesn't have to be this way. The Farm bill is nothing more than government subsidies to farmers. Factory farms do not need government handouts and welfare, they should stop sucking on the public tit and pay their fair share. Why do taxpayers have to pay farmers to throw away food and artificially raise prices?

Everybody poops; animals just happen to do it more than the rest of us. A lactating dairy cow can produce 150 pounds of manure every day. Twenty broiler chickens will produce over four pounds a day. And that leaves plenty of farmers with too much poop on their hands.

From
OneGreenPlanet:

Vegetarian Recipes:


All Recipes


Cooking Light


Country Living


Delish


Food Network


Yummy Vegetarian


Taste of Home


Vegetarian Times


Vegan meal delivery service


The Inspired Home


Chimichurri Portobello Rice

To Stay in Your Skinny Jeans

Sure, subbing a veggie burger for a hamburger is a no-brainer way to save a lot of calories. But the meat-weight relationship goes beyond calorie math. A large-scale 2010 study from Imperial College London found that those who ate about 250 grams a day (the size of one half-pound steak) of red meat, poultry, or processed meat gained more weight over five years than those who ate less meat, even if they consumed the same amount of calories overall.


Improve Mood

Arachidonic acid is a substance that usually comes from dietary animal sources and, no surprise, vegetarian diets are not high in arachidonic acid. This can be beneficial, as research has shown a link between arachidonic acid and mood disturbances. Researchers at Benedictine University performed a study to investigate the impact of restricting animal products and mood and confirmed that mood improvements do happen when eating meat, fish, and poultry are restricted.


Improve Symptoms of Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes skin redness and irritation and can be debilitating for those who suffer from it. However, according to research published by Brazil’s Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, a vegetarian diet may positively improve symptoms.


Reduce Incidence of Diabetes

According to Loma Linda University School of Public Health, vegetarian diets are associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of diabetes. [4] Information published by George Washington University School of Medicine has also confirmed that vegetarian diets offer an important benefit for the management of diabetes and can even reduce the likelihood of development by one half.

Reduces Risk of Cataract Development

Oddly enough, research released by the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine at the University of Oxford has shown a strong relation between the risk of developing cataracts and diet; with a higher risk falling on meat eaters and the lowest risk groups being vegetarians and vegans.


Reduces Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

According to the JCU University Skin Cancer Research Clinic, there is a relationship between a vegetarian diet and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. Why? Most vegetarian diets are full of antioxidant rich foods. Antioxidants are molecules that can reduce the damage caused by oxidative stress, including atherosclerosis.


Less Risk of Stroke and Obesity

There are always exceptions but, in general, vegetarians and vegans tend to be much more deliberate in their food choices and far less likely to binge eat or choose foods based on emotions- two habits that greatly contribute to obesity. According to the University Hospital Ghent Department of Paediatrics in Belgium, following a vegetarian diet is a good way to reduce your chance at having a stroke or being obese.


Vegetarians Usually Have Low Cholesterol

There’s no health benefit, at all, to eating animal fat. It should come as no surprise that when you remove it from your diet, you will also remove the detrimental effects it has on your health life. After examining the long term effects of following a vegetarian diet, Korean researchers very comfortably concluded that body fat, and cholesterol levels were lower in vegetarians than omnivores.


Read more: https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/9-health-benefits-of-a-vegetarian-diet/ 

Underground America Incorporated 2018

Varieties of vegetarians

By Harvard/Staying Heathy

Strictly speaking, vegetarians are people who don't eat meat, poultry, or seafood. But people with many different dietary patterns call themselves vegetarians, including the following:

Vegans (total vegetarians): Do not eat meat, poultry, fish, or any products derived from animals, including eggs, dairy products, and gelatin.

Lacto-ovo vegetarians: Do not eat meat, poultry, or fish, but do eat eggs and dairy products.

Lacto vegetarians: Eat no meat, poultry, fish, or eggs, but do consume dairy products.

Ovo vegetarians: Eat no meat, poultry, fish, or dairy products, but do eat eggs.

Partial vegetarians: Avoid meat but may eat fish (pesco-vegetarian, pescatarian) or poultry (pollo-vegetarian).    

10 Reasons to Eat Less Meat
Cutting back on meat (even a little bit) can reap big health and environmental benefits

By Amy Van Deusen


To Help Your Heart

Limit the animal-fare and you'll be reducing your likelihood for heart disease, the number-one killer of women. "Fatty red meats and many processed meats are high in saturated fat, which raises LDL (bad) cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease," says Dr. Rachel K. Johnson, a spokesperson for the American Heart Association and professor of Nutrition and Medicine at the University of Vermont. Studies, including one of more than 500,000 people published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, have shown that eating high quantities of these meats (e.g. a small steak every day) also increases the risk of death from cardiovascular disease.


To Shrink your Cancer Risk

Right up there on the list of scary diseases is cancer, and it's becoming increasingly clear that a meat-cancer connection exists. In one study of more than 35,000 women published in the British Journal of Cancer, those who ate the most red and processed meat were found to have the highest risk of breast cancer. Other research has linked meat consumption to colon, prostate, pancreatic, and gastric cancers as well. One theory, according to non-profit group The Cancer Project, is that foods with high levels of fat artificially boost the hormones that promote cancer.


To Really Go Green

Raising cattle for beef and milk spews more greenhouse gases into the air than all of the cars currently on the road. That stat came from a 2006 U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization report, which also found that the livestock industry wreaks havoc on our land and water—taking up vast amounts of scarce resources, and polluting the waterways more than probably any other industry.

Eating a plant-based meal for lunch instead of a burger saves 2.5 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions, 133 gallons of water, and 24 square feet of land, according to the people over at the PB&J Campaign. They've calculated that in just three lunches, you'll have saved more water than you'll save by switching to a low-flow showerhead.

(How to) Be a Vegetarian/Vegan (for Dummies)

From around the web/By Christopher R Rice


A lot of people do not understand the immense health benefits that come from avoiding meat and/or dairy. But not only does it benefit the animals and your own health tremendously it also benefits the environment and all of mankind. Here's how: 

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Nearly half of all the water used in the United States goes to raising animals for food (“The Food Revolution” by John Robbins). It takes more than 2,400 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of meat and only 25 gallons to produce one pound of wheat (“Water Inputs in California Food Production” by Marcia Kreith)


To produce a day’s food for one meat-eater takes over 4,000 gallons; for a lacto-ovo vegetarian, only 1200 gallons; for a vegan, only 300 gallons (The Vegetarian Times Complete Cookbook)


Animals raised for food produce approximately 130 times as much excrement as the entire human population and animal farms pollute our waterways more than all other industrial sources combined. Run-offs of animal waste, pesticides, chemicals, fertilizers, hormones and antibiotics are contributing to dead zones in coastal areas, degradation of coral reef and health problems. (
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency).


Raising animals for food (including land used for grazing and land used to grow feed crops) now uses a staggering 30% of the Earth’s land mass. (
Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options, a 2006 report published by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization)


Seven football fields’ worth of land is bulldozed every minute to create more room for farmed animals and the crops that feed them. (
The Smithsonian Institution)


Of all the agricultural land in the U.S., 80% is used to raise animals for food and grow grain to feed them—that’s almost half the total land mass of the lower 48 states (“Major Uses of Land in the United States” by Marlow Vesterby and Kenneth S. Krupa)


The massive amounts of excrement produced by livestock farms emit toxic gases such as hydrogen sulfide and ammonia into the air. Roughly 80% of ammonia emissions in the U.S. come from animal waste (
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency).


When the cesspools holding tons of urine and feces get full, factory farms will frequently get around water pollution limits by spraying liquid manure into the air, creating mists that are carried away by the wind. (“
Neighbors of Vast Hog Farms Say Foul Air Endangers Their Health,” by Jennifer Lee, The New York Times 11 May 2003)


Air pollutants generated by animal farms can cause respiratory illness, lung inflammation, and increase vulnerability to respiratory diseases, such as asthma. Emissions of reactive organics and ammonia from animal farming can play a role in the formation of ozone (smog) and air pollution (The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency)


In the U.S., 70% of the grain grown is fed to animals on feedlots (“Plants, Genes, and Agriculture” by  Jones and Bartlet)


It takes up to 16 pounds of grain to produce just 1 pound of meat. (
The Global Benefits of Eating Less Meat by Mark Gold and Jonathon Porritt). Fish on fish farms must be fed 5 pounds of wild-caught fish to produce one pound of farmed fish flesh (“The Food Revolution” by John Robbins)


The world’s cattle alone consume a quantity of food equal to the caloric needs of 8.7 billion people—more than the entire human population on Earth (“The Global Benefits of Eating Less Meat” by Mark Gold and Jonathon Porritt)


Animal agriculture is responsible for 18% of the total release of greenhouse gases world-wide (this is more than all the cars, trucks, planes, and ships in the world combined)  (Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options, a 2006 report published by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization)


Livestock account for an estimated 9% of global CO2 (Carbon Dioxide) emissions, estimated 35-40% of global CH4 (Methane) emissions and 65% of NO2 (Nitrous Oxide) emissions (Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options, a 2006 report published by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization)


By replacing your “regular car” with a Toyota Prius the average person can prevent the emission of about 1 tonne of CO2 into the atmosphere, By replacing an omnivorous diet with a vegan diet the average person can prevent the emission of about 1.5 tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere. That’s 50% more CO2 saved! (“
It’s better to green your diet than your car”, The New Scientist, December 17, 2005.)


More than a third of all raw materials and fossil fuels consumed in the United States are used in animal production (“Ecological Cooking” by Joanne Stepaniak and Kathy Hecker)


The production of one calorie of animal protein requires more than ten times the fossil fuel input as a calorie of plant protein. (
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition)


Producing a single hamburger uses enough fuel to drive 20 miles and causes the loss of five times its weight in topsoil. (“The Food Revolution” by John Robbins)We can all start working on sustainable alternatives or attempt to make sustainable choices as a solution to this problem, but the easiest solution is the elimination of the demand for animal based products.


Switching to a plant-based lifestyle is the only long term solution that not only benefits the environment, but also the animals and our health.